Yong green food

Although gluten free and vegan foods are on the rise in Melbourne, it is surprisingly difficult to find a restaurant that offers a broad range of both gf and vegan options. That’s where Yong Green Food comes in. It caters to almost every dietary requirement under the sun, with a handy colour coded menu. The chilled ambiance and roomy tables also made it a great place to catch up with visiting out of towners and friends.

The Matcha latte was an incredibly bright green colour. Yong Green offers a wide range of milks, from dairy to soy, to coconut and almond at no extra cost! I was tempted by the almond milk but decided to play it safe. I found this to be more powdery and sweet than most matcha lattes, but perhaps that is due to the soy milk.

Ryan commented that the espresso wasn’t the best, and didn’t provide him with the caffeine boost he so desperately needed. Our friends ordered a chai tea and some of the cold drinks. These seemed to go down a treat.

yong green food

I ordered the Yin and Yang Charger. Initially, I was a bit dubious because it was one of the most expensive items on the menu. However, once this spread arrived in front of me I knew that I had made the right choice. Interestingly, the highlight wasn’t the fried mushrooms. Instead, I found the squash salad to be utterly delicious. It was cold, sweet, soft and just a touch stringy. The soup also had incredible savoury depth for a vegetarian offering.

yong green food japchae

Ryan and one of my friends both ordered the Japchae. I usually make my Japchae vegetarian so I had no doubts that this could be incredible even though it had no meat. I snuck in a bite and found it much less greasy than the usual japchae at restaurants but full of flavour. The vegetables tasted fresh and light, and noodles had good bite.

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My gluten intolerant friend ordered the chili. She commented that it had a good spicy kick to it that went well with the sour cream.

The Vegetarian curry was a very generous portion. It looked and smelled exactly like a beef Japanese curry.

The Katsu was a little bit more diminutive in size. I’m assured, however, that it was very tasty. Especially when mixed with the curry sauce. We all agreed that the biodynamic rice that came with a lot of the dishes was excellent.

The service was friendly if at times a bit scattered. They also pulled up tables for our group of 6, even though it would have been fine for us to squish together on the larger table!

Raw, organic, vegan, gluten free, no onion and garlic? Yong Green Food has it covered. More than that, it serves some straight up tasty food regardless of the labels.

http://yonggreenfood.com.au/

Yong Green Food Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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LUNE Lab

When it comes to croissants LUNE is, without doubt, the most well-known store in all of Melbourne, and perhaps one of the most well known in the world courtesy of this New York Times Article. I’ve enjoyed croissants from LUNE many a time.

From their humble cult beginnings when people line up at 5am for the chance to take home up to 6 classic and twice baked croissants, LUNE has expanded significantly. At their now, not so new, location there’s no need to get there first thing in the morning unless of course, you’re angling for a particular special flavour. There will still be plenty of traditional croissants and a selection of other treats like the ham and gyure croissants or a twice baked almond croissant ready for you to pick up or eat in even at 11am.

At this point, I think most Melbournians who are serious about pastries have tried LUNE at least once. However, LUNE Lab is a bit more of a mystery. I must admit that I was a little bit sceptical about paying $60 (plus booking fees) for what I thought was essentially just three croissants. However, it would be more accurate to describe this as a pastry degustation with all you can drink coffee and hot chocolate.

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LUNE lab somehow feels very exclusive and inclusive. Patrons sit at the counter away from the crowd and lines, but at the same time, the space is still very much shared by the croissant making cube and customers coming in and out.

It was still very early in the morning so a Flat White was in order. This was milky and easy to drink. The beans are sourced from Small Batch in North Melbourne and in line with LUNE’s ethos of supporting local small-scale producers. I could have done with a coffee that was extracted a little bit more and stronger, but I guess it’s a good thing that I didn’t start too strong, as there was still time for more drinks.

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The first course for every single LUNE lab is always the same. It’s a classic croissant, ten minutes from the oven, which according to the people at LUNE is the best time to have them. They offered us our choice of croissant, from crunchy to soft. It seems that most of the people preferred crunchy croissants. Whereas I picked one that was a combination of soft fluffy pastry on the inside and crispy layers on the outside. There was a distinct difference between Ryan’s crisp croissant and my combination croissant. The contrast between the soft warm buttery inside and flaky crust was heavenly. Eating the plain LUNE croissant is always a must and it’s even better served fresh.

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The rillette danish completely took me by surprise. This was described as LUNE’s take on a sweet and salty dish. The fruity caramelised jam on the side being the sweet component and the rillette the salty. In the danish was a perfect square of the most succulent pork rillette I have ever had in my life. Even though the meat was brimming with juice somehow the pastry stayed crispy the entire time. After this dish, I’m seriously considering having rillette with croissants instead of baguettes from now on!

To go with this I helped myself to the filter coffee. Usually, my heart lies with milk coffees, but the filter was LUNE was excellent. It was distinctly fruity and just bold enough to carry the flavour of the beans without being overpowering.

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I think everyone left out a collective gasp of amazement when we saw the towering ice cream sandwich. Apparently, ever since LUNE Lab started, the owner has wanted to put an ice cream sandwich on the menu. This certainly looked the part. Buttermilk ice cream is sandwiched between two identical rounds of sticky, sugary, crispy pastry. Saying that this was messy to eat is an understatement! Everyone on the table took a slightly different approach to digging in.

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I found that the easiest way was to cut it in half and then eat with my hands with reckless abandon. Puffed rice added a little bit of crispness. The slightly sour raspberry and mild ice cream melted into each of the layers of pastry. Personally, I could have done with a more assertive tasty ice cream, but this was a whole lot of fun.

Mork hot chocolate rounded off the sweet course. I had a soy hot chocolate whereas Ryan ordered a standard milk. Ryan actually started drinking the soy hot chocolate and was none the wiser until the second cup arrived and we were told that was actually his. I was shocked at how satisfying and creamy the soy hot chocolate was.

While dining you can order as many LUNE croissants as you want for take-away. There’s something satisfying about being able to grab the last few limited edition or new croissant offerings without ever having to wait in line.

Despite my initial reservations, LUNE lab delivered on all fronts. Sitting in LUNE for an hour and a half really gives a very unique perspective on the whole croissant making process. The staff are more than happy to answer any burning questions you might have and you get to observe the meticulous process of croissant making all the while you fill your stomach.

lune lab fresh

Website

Lune Croissanterie Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

P.S It’s been a while since I posted about the food scene in Melbourne. You might have noticed that I’ve also been blogging less frequently. These past few months I’ve been very busy, but hopefully I’ll be able to post a lot more during the Christmas break!

All C’s cafe

Did you notice that there’s a lot of tasty things that start with the letter C. For example, cake, cookie, chocolate, coffee, crepe and cafe? The people behind All C’s cafe were smart enough to pick up on this and run with it.

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Located on the second floor of a fairly non-descript building in Koenji, All C’s cafe also brings another C word to mind: Cute. The interior looks like the candy covered house in Hansel and Gretal bought to life. Every corner is covered in cute candy decor. You don’t need to go on this adventure alone either because there’s also plenty of cuddly bear friends. I named my new friend Alberto, even though I’m sure he already has a name.

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Ryan’s chai latte is one of the cutest drinks I have ever seen. The smiley boy surrounded by frothy milk was almost much too cute to drink. Ryan showed much more fortitude than I did, and tucked right in. It was pleasantly spicy, sweet and milky.

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For some reason, it seems like my standard tea order in Japan was almost always apple tea. This cup was so large it almost seemed like a bowl. Although it came with sugar, the fragrant apple lent the tea enough sweetness already.

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After some deliberation, we settled on the pudding trio. I was a little disappointed to see that they were using frozen fruit on the fruits pudding. However, this feeling quickly faded when I tasted the actual pudding. It was shockingly smooth, silky and just eggy enough to be full of comforting flavour, but not too much so that it tasted like scrambled eggs. My favourite was the slightly bitter walnut and shortbread topped pudding. The caramel was slightly more bitter and the crunchy biscuit and nuts provided a really good contrast to the soft pudding.

All C’s cafe also offers cookie decorating classes and party plans. I have a feeling that if I lived in the area I would be tempted to check them out! For now, I think it suffices to say that no matter where you are in Japan it’s possible to stumble into a cute corner like this one!

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Website

Aoyama Flower Market Tea House

Aoyama Flower Market Tea House could be the most photogenic cafe in all of Tokyo. As the name would suggest Aoyama Flower market is actually a florist. They have locations all over Japan, but the tea houses are found only in Tokyo.  Every surface is adorned with fresh seasonal flowers that change weekly.

Aoyama

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From the outside, the original Aoyama Flower Market Tea House looks like any other florist. The only way you can tell that it’s a cafe is from the line of Japanese girls waiting to get in. I’ve heard that the line can be somewhat excruciating, but I was determined to wait it out and see this cafe for myself. Perhaps it was because we visited on a weekday, but a short but very warm 20-minute wait later we were promptly seated.

 

The weekly theme was delphiniums. Each table had at least one cute little pot next to or on the table itself.

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I felt like something light so the  Tea House Salad was my choice. Initially, I thought that the entire sprigs of herbs would be too overpowering, but after making my way through this plate I found the whole thing very well balanced. The creamy but tangy dressing really brought everything together. I do still question the inclusion of the biscuit pieces in the otherwise fresh salad.

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Ryan loves sandwiches. The Roast beef sandwich on the lunch menu jumped out at him. Perhaps it’s because western style sandwiches tend to be meatier and more substantial but Ryan wasn’t all that impressed with the actual sandwich. Instead, he really enjoyed the carrot salad on the side! No mean feat considering Ryan isn’t usually one to order salads.

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Vacation tea tasted of tropical fruits. Although no sweeteners were added I found that the fruity flavour didn’t need anything else to bring out the flavour. I can imagine myself sipping this iced or hot, leisurely by the beach in a tropical country. The Iced House Tea helped cool us down on a hot day but otherwise wasn’t as remarkable as the other drinks.

 

 

 

Flower Parfait is the piece de la resistance of the whole cafe in my opinion. Delicately flavoured rose jelly sits atop crunchy biscuits and granola. The top is liberally sprinkled with even more flowers and a scoop of ice cream plopped on top. This struck the golden ratio for parfaits. Each mouthful was a contrast of textures, flavours and temperatures. The somewhat unusual addition of jelly really made it stand out.

Akasaka

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Unusually for Japan, Aoyama Flower Market tea house in Akasaka has an abundance of alfresco seating. When the weather is good you can lounge around outside, in amongst the beautiful flora and watch businessmen and trendy Tokyoites pass on by. Whereas the Aoyama location is dominated by girls chatting, I feel like this could be the right place to go on a date. The almost European feeling outdoor seating and hushed interior warmed softly by a couple of street lights and recycled lamps are positively romantic.

Unlike Aoyama, this location also has a couple of more substantial dinner offerings and a dinner menu that offers a main, drink, mini dessert and a small bag of flowers to take home!

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Farm Bowl or perhaps more accurately translated as a field bowl. I would describe this as a healthier version of taco rice. Spiced minced beef with tomatoes is placed on top of a generous serving of rice. The real stand out of this dish was actually the vegetable leafs! They tasted incredibly fresh and provided a crisp and refreshing bite when mixed with everything else.

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Vegetable gratin or more literally, baked pasta. Ryan was super happy with this dish because it was covered in delicious melted cheese, which can sometimes be a bit of a rare commodity in Japan.

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One of the most popular choices at Aoyama Flower Market Tea House is the French toast. The Mini French toast is a good way to try it without having a whole serve. Although the small size doesn’t have the same fruits and flowers scattered atop the dish, the actual French toast is still a winner. It’s soft, slightly eggy and sweet enough even without lashings of syrup.

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Mini shortcake is much more normal as far as desserts go. The cherry on top was delicious as was the cream, but I expected a little more from the cake. It was soft and easy to eat but was a little bit bland.

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Fresh Herb Tea is one of the signature drinks at all the tea houses. To my understanding, it’s really just a combination of herbs steeped in hot water. I was a little surprised at just how much the minty lemongrass taste came through. Ryan had another tropical tasting tea with mango flavours. This was also another great choice.

As part of the dinner set menu, we got to take home a small bunch of seasonal flowers. I was so happy to get a cute bag of hydrangeas, as they really encapsulate the rainy season and are some of my favourite flowers. It was a real shame that we were flying back home the next day and couldn’t take them with us! I passed them on to the girls at the hotel reception desk instead, and they were very thankful!

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The decor and menu of both cafes are different enough to warrant a visit to both locations. However, if I had to pick just one I would recommend Akasaka. The late hours and spacious outdoor seating mean that you probably won’t have to wait in line for a table. The lack of other people also made for a much more subdued and relaxing atmosphere.

Tokyo has no shortage of themed cafes and restaurants. After going to a few you’ll see a trend. The more overt the theme is, the worse the food. In all honesty, I wasn’t expecting much from Aoyama Flower Market Tea House culinary wise, thinking that it would be more about the pretty decor. However, the food was almost as beautiful and tasty as the flowers were gorgeous.

English Website

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Ramen Trio

You would have thought that after eating ramen every day in Fukuoka we would be sick of it, but such is the variety and depth of ramen culture that even in Tokyo we managed to down a couple bowls. In fact, I think ramen ended up being our most eaten meal during this whole trip. Between us, we had 19 bowls of ramen over the course of 5 weeks! So, let’s get stuck into the final 6 bowls we had in Tokyo.

Fuunji
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Fuunji serves ramen, but its specialty is actually Tsukemen. That is, thick al dente noodles are dipped into a hot broth.

On any given night (or day) there is bound to be a line of people waiting outside. However, rest assured this moves rather quickly. The main chef is very charismatic seems to be something of a minor celebrity.

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The noodles are much thicker than your normal ramen. Each strand had a good bite and springy chewiness to it that made it a real pleasure to eat.

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We both got the special tsukemen with extra egg. The special elements comes from the powder sitting atop the thick dipping broth. This is almost concentrated bonito umami flavour. To be honest, this would have already had plenty of flavour even without the special flavour bomb, but this just took it to the maximum level. Perhaps I would have done better finishing my bowl if I had chosen to pare back the salt and intensity a little!

Tsukemen is one of those foods that you need to be able to eat ASAP to get maximum enjoyment. The noodles are served cold, to capture the perfect bite. The cold noodles and aircon mean that the broth can get rather cold if not slurped up straight away. This tends to make it a bit too salty and cloying to fully enjoy.

Once you’re done with the noodles you’re invited to add warm soup to the broth to thin it out and drink the remaining liquid. I actually liked this part best, because it added another dimension to the broth and warmed me back up all the way to my toes!

As a word of warning, DO NOT, get extra noodles and meat. It may not look it, but the tsukemen is incredibly filling. I think the noodles somehow expand in your stomach and take up more room! The normal tsukemen with no extra toppings is already a very generous serving that most people will struggle to finish. That said, somehow Ryan managed to finish his extra noodles, egg, and meat and helped me with mine. We staggered back home, literally weighed down by all the noodles and soup we had just consumed.

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Ramen Afuri
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Ramen Afuri is known as a popular spot for ladies. The airy white walls and locations, which are located in stylish shopping meccas like Shinjuku, Roppongi, and Harajuku, are worlds away from the somewhat brusque and masculine spaces inhabited by salary men and mostly male clientele.

It’s not just the way the restaurant looks that make it a popular choice with Japanese girls, but also what it serves. For the diet, conscious Ramen Afuri serves konnyaku noodles which are almost zero calories, and offer lighter more refreshing options.

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I picked the Yuzu shio ramen, hoping for as much yuzu flavour as possible. The yuzu wasn’t immediately apparent. The first sips revealed a comforting chicken broth taste. It was only after a couple of slurps that I got the fresh citrusy yuzu taste.

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Yuzuratanmen was Ryan’s choice. We’re both not sure how much the spicy chicken oil and yuzu worked together, but this is definitely a much more flavourful bowl. It’s got a little bit of a kick but would probably still be pleasantly spicy to those who don’t regularly eat hot foods.

Props to the charcoal cooked chasu in both bowls. It was full of rich smokey flavour and gave the otherwise light broths an extra something.

Ramen isn’t the most healthy of foods. As much as I loved the fatty and rich lip smacking tonkotsu ramen of Fukuoka, I struggled to finish it. The ramen from Ramen Afuri was on the complete opposite end of the spectrum. The freshness of Yuzu and light-handed seasoning meant that I probably could have had two bowls. Although lack of richness prompted Ryan to comment that this was his least favourite ramen on the trip, I have to disagree. This is a ramen that I could eat regularly, guilt-free!

As an added bonus Ramen Afuri one of the few places where you can get a vegan ramen!

Ginza Kagari
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I’ve saved the best for last. In my mind Ginza Kagari is to ramen, what high-end sushi-yas are to sushi. Much like kaiten-sushi, the local run of the mill ramen-ya is a great fuss-free option. However, to really get a greater understanding of the true depth and artistry of ramen, visiting a place like Ginza kagari is essential.

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Down a rather obscure and narrow alleyway in ritzy Ginza, is a small sign with the word ‘soba’ on it. This is Ginza kagari. In keeping with Japanese courtesy, there’s an umbrella rack outside offering parasols for the sun and umbrellas for the rain while you wait. Considering that it was sweltering hot the day we visited, this was most welcome.

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There’s no vending machine in sight. Orders are taken while waiting and everyone is seated at the counter at the same time for the same sitting. It’s a little bit cramped with big bags and not much elbow room but we all made it work.

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Ginza Kagari’s tori paitan is something else entirely. The broth is thick and creamy.  From the first mouthful, there is an incredible depth of flavour. I’m not sure how else to describe this other than chicken tonkotsu. The chicken bones lend a less fatty taste to the both but don’t sacrifice anything on flavour. Tender chicken pieces and fresh seasonal vegetables sit atop the noodles. This is some of the most beautifully plated ramen anywhere.

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It doesn’t stop there either. The extra plate features the gooiest and golden eggs and a side of roast beef and shisho on a charming wabi-sabi plate.

One taste of Ginza kagari was enough to completely blow away Ryan’s skepticism about chicken ramen. Days after we got back to Australia, he was still waxing lyrical about this place.

For the most part, all the diehard Japanese fans seem to tout ramen stores in far flung and obscure suburbs as the best of the best. With limited time on our hands, we ended up in places that were much more central and rather well visited by other tourists. That said, these places were miles ahead of anything back home in Australia. If you’re ever stuck for a meal, hopping down to the nearest ramen place with a line outside is almost guaranteed to give you a good meal.

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Berry Parlour by cafe comme ca: Ikebukuro

On previous visits to Tokyo, I’ve always liked staying in Ikebukuro. It’s on the Yamanote line, connected with a lot of major train lines, bustling with activity but not as overwhelming as Shinjuku or Shibuya. In some ways Ikebukuro is a perfect crossroads for tourists, it’s full of shops, themed cafes, entertainment and anime and manga goods.

More importantly, there’s also plenty of good food. It’s well serviced by heaps of casual eateries and ramen stores, but this time I had something sweeter in mind. Most people who are are familiar with the area will immediately think of Milky Way Cafe for cute and colourful parfaits. As much as I enjoy the galaxy themed cafe I was on the search for something a little more refined.

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Berry Parlour by Cafe Comme Ca isn’t the sort of place that you can just stumble upon while looking for food. It’s located on the 7th floor of the Seibu department store. In amongst a floor of expensive glassware and tea ware is a rather inconspicuous cafe.

The atmosphere is hushed. Most of the noise comes from the soft classical music in the background and the chit-chat of the sophisticated looking ladies enjoying their leisurely afternoon. If it weren’t for a single High School student and her mum also tucking into a parfait, I probably would have felt entirely out of place.

There’s a small selection of cakes, but I think everyone knows that the main drawcard is really the parfaits. These are some of the most beautiful fruit parfaits I have ever seen. Each piece of fruit is sliced meticulously to create an impression of blossoming flowers when looked down from above. The mango parfait, in particular, was almost too perfect to eat.

Perhaps as an Australian I’ve been spoilt. The mangos didn’t have the same fragrant sweetness as the mangos I’m used to eating by the boxful in the height of Summer. However, mangos are pretty rare for Tokyo, so for most Japanese people just being able to try this parfait would be a bit of a luxury.

That aside, each delicate piece of fruit was so consistent. There wasn’t a single blemish and each differently cut slice was so similar in texture it was almost crazy. The soft slightly sweet cream was a good addition that didn’t overpower the fruit or the crunchy cereal. The sour passionfruit coulis on the side was a pretty addition but not necessary.

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I’m going to admit that Mont Blancs are one of my least favourite cakes. They seem to be ubiquitous in Japan but something about the sugary chestnut paste usually puts me off. The strawberry mont blanc seriously made me reconsider my stance. The fresh berries and cream cut through the chestnut. This was especially good with the cereal, as each mouthful was crunchy, sweet and juicy all at once. The raspberry coulis could be added if at any point it got a touch too sweet or dry. As beautiful as the mango parfait was, I’m going to have to concede that this really was the standout parfait of the day.

Berry parlour is just one of the many Cafe comme cas in Japan. Whereas the other cafes tend to focus on tarts and cakes, Berry Parlour’s short menu has parfaits front right and centre. Sophisticated but not unapproachable, Berry Parlour is the perfect introduction to high end Japanese fruit, high end Japanese parfaits and fancy knife work.

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Hidemi Sugino

Who is Hidemi Sugino? In Japan, he is revered as a master cake maker, famed for his mousse cakes and being the first in Asia to win many prestigious awards, but outside of the country, I’m not too sure how many people have heard of him. This may be because unlike other patissiers he has not expanded his cake empire overseas, choosing instead to have a small simple store down an unassuming street in Ginza. Furthermore, almost as an anathema to current social media trends, no photos are allowed of the cake display or dining room. Instead, the cakes are plated and eaten in a sort of sedate and hushed reverie.

In spite of this, it seems that people were in the know and ready for cakes at their opening time of 11. When we arrived 10 minutes before opening there was already a small line outside. We were each ushered into the store to pick cakes for dine in, take away or both. I highly recommend dining in because there is a selection of cakes which can only be had in the café. According to the staff, they are too delicate to be transported. Of the cakes that can actually be taken away, even then, it is recommended that most of them only travel for an hour or so, to preserve their integrity.

The cakes are well and truly tiny. Even the super slim Japanese girls sitting on either side of me ordered at least 2 cakes each. If I was feeling a little bit more ambitious I probably could have ordered up to 3 or 4 cakes for myself but for now, we stuck with 4 to share.

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The Ambroise (Left) is arguably the cake that made Hidemi Sugino famous. A dark chocolate glaze and tempered chocolate rounds cover a delicate multi-layered cake. The slick chocolate makes this cake look incredibly rich. In a way it is, the cherry taste of dark chocolate seems a little overwhelming at first. However, it gives way to a much gentler berry and pistachio flavours and layers, well suited to a Japanese palette that doesn’t enjoy things that are too sweet.

The Sous Bois (Right) was Ryan’s favourite. Embedded into this cake are more berries! The sourness of the berries offset the sweetness of the mousse, making each mouthful a surprise. It also goes without saying but each of the fruits on all of the cakes tasted exceptional. In particular, the raspberries weren’t tart, and instead the flowery, almost perfume like taste of raspberry exploded in my mouth.

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The Everest (Right) was more to my tastes. It’s easy to see where this cake gets its name from. The peak of white cream at the top was sweet and soft. In fact, I would hazard to say that eating this was akin to eating a cloud. Every bite, soft and airy, with a little bit of juicy berry flavour from the hidden juice inside. Ryan commented that it tasted like a very soft and subtle cheesecake.

I thought that it would be impossible to top but the Sicily (Left) was even softer than the Everest! A strong pistachio flavour permeated the outer layer of green mousse. This is tempered by the peach and raspberry mouse inside. The texture was halfway between cream and panna cotta. I think I detected a light alcohol taste in the sponge at the bottom that made me smile a little. The taste of pistachio and alcohol definitely reminded me of southern Italy.

The beverages come at rather eye-watering prices. My single cup of apple tea was 780 Yen and Ryan’s tiny cup of espresso set us back 540 Yen. Thankfully, they were both well brewed. After dining at a number of Tokyo cafes, this beverage pricing, although shocking for an Australian is very much in line with most other premium cafes. I suppose these prices are part of the air of exclusivity and luxury that is inherent in dining in the hushed back room of the café.

Although I was ready to make the pilgrimage to Hidemi Sugino, I was also ready to be disappointed because I find that I simply don’t like mousse cake all that much. However, the delicate balance of flavours and soft set mousse at Hidemi Sugino has well and truly made me a convert. I only wish that there were more places which had such stringent standards for their own mousse cakes.

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Padre Coffee East Brunswick

Padre Coffee is a big name in the Melbourne coffee scene. After a little bit of research, I also learnt that Padre means father in many languages. It seemed appropriate to be visiting their East Brunswick store where it all began with my very own father (and mother). As soon as I entered the store the heady smell of coffee beans filled the air. It all makes sense as soon as you see the coffee roaster on premise.

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The large latte arrived in a bowl! This is my mum’s favourite cup of coffee, smooth and strong without a trace of acidity. On the other hand, a regular cappuccino comes in a normal cup. The froth on top is just as beautiful as that of the latte!

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I had a Yunnan green tea instead of coffee because I was still feeling a bit unwell. I appreciated how they took the time and care to brew a proper pot of green tea, instead of just filling a pot with boiling water like some cafes are wont to do. It was a touch too cold, on the lower end of 70 degrees perhaps due to not sufficiently warming the pot or cup.

For such a large venue there’s not much in the way of food, but that’s just fine because the real focus is on the coffee. That’s not to say that the small selection of pastries isn’t delicious. We shared a flaky ham scroll that went perfectly with the coffees.

Adjoined to the cafe, there’s also a veritable cornucopia of coffee making supplies. If you’re in the market for anything coffee related or even just a cup (or bowl!) of coffee this is the place to go.

padre coffee

https://shop.padrecoffee.com.au/
Padre Coffee Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

By Josephine

I’ve never been to Paris before. However, if it is anything like By Josephine I can see why so many others are enamoured with it. It somehow manages to be effortlessly classy and whimsical all at once. The interior would look perfectly at home in a shabby chic Pinterest inspiration board. The pastry display is offset with a beautiful glow of light. I daresay it would be impossible to walk in and leave empty handed. In fact, I also bought a canele and pistachio and raspberry croissant for later!

By Josephine high tea

On this occasion, I was partaking in a leisurely high tea with friends. The high tea offers a wide selection of drinks, from tea (hot or cold), coffees and even juice. It’s hard to go past a traditional pot of hot tea when sweets are involved. The Detox Tea was pleasantly somewhere between green and herbal tea.

By Josephine tea

A selection of macarons accompanied the tea. The flavours were pistachio, chocolate and salted caramal. In terms of flavour the pistachio was my favourite, but it certainly doesn’t beat the black sesame that By Josephine also puts out. Impressively, all the macarons at By Josephine are made by hand rather than machine!

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As always savouries were on the bottom tier of the stand. The chicken & tarragon pain au lait looked incredibly inviting, with a glistening sheen to the pain au lait bun. I liked the bursts of tarragon but found myself wishing that the bread was a little bit warmer and softer. Palmiers remind me of my childhood. I loved going to the bakery with my parents and picking out the largest and flakiest palmier covered with sugar crystals to snack on. Biting into the tapenade & sundried tomato palmier was just like revisiting that joy but as an adult. The cheese gougère is definitely one for cheese lovers. The rich goat’s cheese sat neatly in the light choux pastry. I don’t entirely remember what the square pastry was, but I will say that it reminded me of a pizza in the best way.It wouldn’t be a French high tea without a buttery quiche to help round off the savoury plate.

By Josephine brule

The top most tier contained a small pot of lavender infused crème brûlée and cubes of grapefruit marshmallow. I am a bit of a sucker for home made marshmallows and lavender so it was a nor brainer that I would love both of these. Thankfully the crème brûlée was flavoured with a light hand so it didn’t taste soapy.

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That just leaves the middle tier of even more sweet treats! Pistachio bread and butter pudding with raspberry coulis and custard on top was a wonderful twist on an old classic. I imagine this would be even better served warm straight from the baking tray. Spiced biscuits were a surprise hit! Crispy and full of warm cinnamon flavour, I could have easily eaten a handful. The raspberry and chocolate tartelette was probably the richest part of the whole tea. I struggled to finish everything else after eating this. So much so that I ended up taking the rose & raspberry tea cake home to give to my mum.

The 3 tiered stand was so full that our madeleines didn’t fit on! Sadly this means that I forgot to take a photo of them. You’ll just have to trust me when I say that they were small, cute and perfect dipped in tea.

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By Josephine also offers a vegetarian and gluten free high tea menu. The gluten free set that my friends shared looked likewise plentiful and delicious.

At $42 this high tea a real bargain for the incredible selection of food! In eschewing the usual scones and sandwiches By Josephine makes every item in the high tea seem exciting and different. My only real gripe is that it only includes one drink. In typical French style, there is plenty of butter and some of the foods are very rich so it’s a bit difficult to finish them without a drink to offset the heaviness. I found myself ordering another pot of peppermint tea halfway through tea service.

By Josephine display

P.S. On the website it states that high tea is only for the duration of 1.5 hours, but this doesn’t seem to be strictly enforced if the store isn’t busy.

http://macaronsbyjosephine.com.au/
By Josephine Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Tina’s Noodle Kitchen

Although it’s still Autumn in Melbourne it feels like we’ve suddenly been plunged into Winter. It’s such a shock to the system to go from an unbearably warm March to the biting cold in April. I must confess it has got me a little down in the dumps and also a little bit sick.

When it’s sick and cold there’s nothing better than a warming bowl of soup. Even better if there are noodles in the soup as well. It seemed like a few other people had the exact same idea as me, as there was a small line outside Tina’s Noodle Kitchen when I arrived. Not one to wait out in the cold I went window shopping in Myer for a while before coming back and being seated instantly.

Ordering and payment are done the same time at the counter. If you look Asian the staff will probably also speak Chinese to you.

Tinas noodles fish and mustard

Fish Slices with Pickles was exactly what I needed. Tender slippery pieces of fish and mustard greens were a great bite. Hidden in the soup were crunchy pieces of black fungus and soft beancurd. The rice noodles are very soft and consequently easy to slurp up.

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Spicy Beef Noodles with added mushrooms are really very spicy. The layer of oil helps seal in the heat and makes for a flaming hot mouthful, heat and spice wise.

After a few mouthfuls of soup noodle, you will notice that both of the broths are very salty. They serve more as noodle flavouring than as a soup that you should drink up. I think this reflects the fact that heavy seasoning a la salt, pepper, pickles and probably a bit of MSG are used as opposed to the laborious process of stewing bones and vegetables for a particularly complex broth. Despite this, Tina’s Noodle Kitchen fills a gap in the city for Chinese style soup noodles. If you’re craving something warming on a cold night, it will probably hit the spot.

Tina's Noodle Kitchen Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato